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Mattias Ohlsson

Mattias Ohlsson

Professor

Mattias Ohlsson

Bone Scan Index: A prognostic imaging biomarker for high-risk prostate cancer patients receiving primary hormonal therapy

Author

  • Reza Kaboteh
  • Jan-Erik Damber
  • Peter Gjertsson
  • Peter Höglund
  • Milan Lomsky
  • Mattias Ohlsson
  • Lars Edenbrandt

Summary, in English

Background: The objective of this study was to explore the prognostic value of the Bone Scan Index (BSI) obtained at the time of diagnosis in a group of high-risk prostate cancer patients receiving primary hormonal therapy. Methods: This was a retrospective study based on 130 consecutive prostate cancer patients at high risk, based on clinical stage (T2c/T3/T4), Gleason score (8 to 10) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) (> 20 ng/mL), who had undergone whole-body bone scans < 3 months after diagnosis and who received primary hormonal therapy. BSI was calculated using an automated method. Cox proportional-hazards regression models were used to investigate the association between clinical stage, Gleason score, PSA, BSI and survival. Discrimination between prognostic models was assessed using the concordance index (C-index). Results: In a multivariate analysis, Gleason score (p = 0.01) and BSI (p < 0.001) were associated with survival, but clinical stage (p = 0.29) and PSA (p = 0.57) were not prognostic. The C-index increased from 0.66 to 0.71 when adding BSI to a model including clinical stage, Gleason score and PSA. The 5-year probability of survival was 55% for patients without metastases, 42% for patients with BSI < 1, 31% for patients with BSI = 1 to 5, and 0% for patients with BSI > 5. Conclusions: BSI can be used as a complement to PSA to risk-stratify high-risk prostate cancer patients at the time of diagnosis. This imaging biomarker, reflecting the extent of metastatic disease, can be of value both in clinical trials and in patient management when deciding on treatment.

Department/s

  • Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics

Publishing year

2013

Language

English

Pages

1-6

Publication/Series

EJNMMI Research

Volume

3

Issue

1

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

BioMed Central (BMC)

Topic

  • Cancer and Oncology

Keywords

  • Bone metastases
  • Image analysis
  • Prostate cancer
  • Radionuclide imaging

Status

Published

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 2191-219X